ozchi 24h student design challenge

Creating a dialog between people and printers by combining health and taste aspects of the future food.

 

BRIEF

We participated in the OzCHI Conference's yearly Student Design Challenge in 2014 as a team. This year's theme was design a creative interface and experience for printing food like fruit and vegetables.


duration & team

24 hours. Together with Aylin Alpay, Martijn van den Broeck, Matthias Karg, Trieuvy Luu. 

Check out our 24 hours blog: kingslothsinspace.tumblr.com

* AWARDED AS RUNNER-UP DURING THE OZCHI CONFERENCE IN SYDNEY.

READ OUR ACADEMIC PAPER ON THIS PROJECT HERE.


RESEARCH & BRAINSTORMING

As a starting point for the challenge, we focused on the material provided by the design challenge. This gave us a general impression of the current status of food printing and possible future developments. Building on this, we tried to generate a broad set of ideas about food printing by brainstorming. These ideas were later clustered in four categories.

 

FRAMING

For each category, we did some online research to look for potential use cases and implementations based on future technologies. We decided to continue our design process with only two categories: discovering new recipes (1) and creating individualized healthy food based on the user’s data (2). We chose these two categories through multi-voting in which each team member expressed their interest in a particular category by voting for it.

Thanks to future thinking scenarios we envisioned the future role of the food printer, grounded by previous research on the Internet of Things. This made us realize the relation between the two categories we had picked. It also helped us to frame our design context in the following research questions: “How does the emotional connection to food remain in a future scenario where printed food is considered solely as a nutrition intake?”

 

PROTOTYPING

Then, we built a low-fidelity prototype to gather initial user input. Our main goal was to get a deeper understanding of the role of food printers in people’s lives. Therefore we confronted four test subjects with the hands-on-experience of having a printer (represented as a paper prototype) presenting them different meals to try. Moreover following the user testing we tried to further explore the idea of what presenting small amounts of food – a kind of test meal – could mean for the user’s diet.


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